Microbiome

Microbiome research
Access key information to take into account microbiome

Host-associated interactions
Understand and leverage microbiomes

Microbiomes and biomarkers/companion diagnostics

Microbiome

We combine cellular and molecular technologies with state-of-the-art in vitro and in vivo preclinical models to enable in-depth exploration of microbiomes and help you understand and exploit microbiome functionality.

Over the past two decades, advanced technologies have allowed researchers to assess the composition of microbiomes and their potential roles.

Thus, modern technologies have created a new era of opportunities for the exploitation of the microbiota as a novel source of diagnostic, prophylactic, or therapeutic solutions.

While you are seeking to assess such opportunities, we are committed to support your R&D programs using our integrated approach, which brings together the appropriate testing methods and expertise.

1

Access key information to exploit the microbiome

  • Explore

Start exploring the vast possibilities of microbiomes. We can help you design a comprehensive approach, by analyzing the taxonomic composition of the microorganisms present and the functional capabilities of microbial communities. A deeper understanding of what these complex ecosystems do and how they respond to environmental changes can be provided through a combination of our multi-omics capabilities and synthetic biology tools, such as digital twins.

Learn more about our OMICS and xDATA technologies.

If you wish to better understand the dynamics of subpopulations, they can be explored at the cellular level using flow cytometry and a panel of markers targeting various phenotypic criteria.

 

  • Isolate

To go further than a genome or cell population-centric view of microbiomes, we can provide you with clinical-grade biospecimens, which enable the isolation and cultivation of microbial cells derived from complex samples. You can find more detailed information on our dedicated page: Clinical Operations. Our proven ‘targeted culturomic’ approach can help you access most commensal bacteria, even if they are highly sensitive to oxygen or not very abundant in samples.

Discover here our case study Ysopia.

 

  • Cultivate

If you wish to obtain sufficient biomass to further characterize the isolated bacteria, we can help you optimize the culture conditions for anaerobic bacteria, from the scale of a few milliliters to bench-top batch fermentation systems. Our expertise can be applied to the characterization of various microorganisms, including probiotics or other microorganisms used for industrial fermentation.

Read more about it in our case study FAME-Maat Pharma.

Microbiote
2

Host-microbiome interactions
Understanding and leveraging microbiomes

If you are a player in the field of therapeutics, nutrition, or cosmetics, microbiomes can be both sources of highly innovative products and targets for intervention. We can help you identify novel candidates for product development and/or evaluate possible interactions between your product, the microbiomes, and their hosts for human and veterinary applications.

With the help of state-of-the-art in vitro and in vivo preclinical models, such as gnotobiotic mice (Read our In Vitro / In Vivo Models offer and case study GM15), we can help you decipher the interactions and possible mode of action of your products in microbiome-oriented approaches.

Whatever the approach you desire to implement, we can help you refine your host-product-microbiome rationale, involving:

  • Molecules and ingredients, possibly derived from microorganisms, that promote the growth of “good bugs”: small molecules, fermented food, postbiotics, prebiotics,
  • Whole microorganisms: live biotherapeutic products (LBP), probiotics, fecal microbiota transplants, inactivated microorganisms, and possibly GMOs.

The potential applications in antimicrobial research are also numerous, including the use of bacteriocins, small molecules, phages, and phage-derived proteins to target pathogenic microorganisms, as well as the search for means of selectively inactivating these pathogenic microorganisms without affecting the rest of the microbiome. Please see the Antimicrobial program.

Microbiome and Biomarkers
3

Microbiomes and biomarkers/companion diagnostics

If you wish to improve the success and approval rates of anti-cancer and anti-infectious interventions, you need to move from a one-size-fits-all approach to personalized medicine and identify who will benefit from a given treatment. The development of a companion diagnostic test is an efficient way to clinically identify these subpopulations, paving the way for individualized treatments based on clinical and biological evidence.

We can help you identify and validate biomarkers or signatures to transform them into a companion, diagnostic, or surrogate end-point test that is well suited for point-of-care or laboratory end use. In particular, our integrated approach, which includes a series of ‘omics’ methods that have been adapted and validated for the study of gut microbiota, but also the skin microbiota or other microbiota, facilitate the achievement of such goals. Please see our Biomarkers offer here.

Vincent Thomas
Vincent ThomasHead of Microbiota programIcon email
Microbiome research
2

Host-microbiome interactions
Understanding and leveraging microbiomes

If you are a player in the field of therapeutics, nutrition, or cosmetics, microbiomes can be both sources of highly innovative products and targets for intervention. We can help you identify novel candidates for product development and/or evaluate possible interactions between your product, the microbiomes, and their hosts for human and veterinary applications.

With the help of state-of-the-art in vitro and in vivo preclinical models, such as gnotobiotic mice (Read our In Vitro / In Vivo Models offer and case study GM15), we can help you decipher the interactions and possible mode of action of your products in microbiome-oriented approaches.

Whatever the approach you desire to implement, we can help you refine your host-product-microbiome rationale, involving:

  • Molecules and ingredients, possibly derived from microorganisms, that promote the growth of “good bugs”: small molecules, fermented food, postbiotics, prebiotics,
  • Whole microorganisms: live biotherapeutic products (LBP), probiotics, fecal microbiota transplants, inactivated microorganisms, and possibly GMOs.

The potential applications in antimicrobial research are also numerous, including the use of bacteriocins, small molecules, phages, and phage-derived proteins to target pathogenic microorganisms, as well as the search for means of selectively inactivating these pathogenic microorganisms without affecting the rest of the microbiome. Please see the Antimicrobials program.

Microbiome and Biomarkers
Open positionStrategic partnership managerIcon email